Diary of the Canterbury Cultural Collections Recovery Centre intern – month 7

By Moya Sherriff, Intern, Canterbury Cultural Collections Recovery Centre.

It’s a new year with a new start at the Canterbury Cultural Collections Recovery Centre (CCCRC). Towards the end of last year we saw an influx of new participants moving in, including the Nurses Chapel, Kate Dewes Archives, larger items from Lyttelton Museum as well as the Oxford Benevolent and Improvement Society.

Lyttelton Museum busy preparing for a new exciting collative project.
Lyttelton Museum busy preparing for a new exciting collative project.

Empty space became scarce during the first week back as items moved in from the Lyttelton Police Station and the United Forces Lodge. Check out the One News report on the Lyttelton Police Station.

As well as new groups, we have also had visitors coming and going. Elizabeth Ridder from Friends of Te Papa (who are supporters of my internship) joined the CCCRC on a Saturday, participating in a fire drill, a cup of coffee and more importantly the chance to meet group members and see what they have been up to over the past few months. We hope to see her again soon!

Kaiapoi Museum members busy working with their glass negative collections.
Kaiapoi Museum members busy working with their glass negative collections.

While a couple of the groups are moving on to the formal accessioning, labelling, photographing, cataloguing and boxing of their collections, the CRFU are leading the pack with the recent completion of an Expert Knowledge Exchange with Judith Taylor (National Services Te Paerangi) on cataloguing artefacts and eHive. Now armed with tools and knowledge, nothing will stop this group from achieving a well-documented and boxed collection before the end of 2015.

CRFU Expert Knowledge Exchange with Judith Taylor.
CRFU Expert Knowledge Exchange with Judith Taylor.

Being in a position to listen in on workshops such as this is something that I really enjoy and learn so much from. With cataloguing, the key take home point for me was the importance of accuracy; being specific with the data entered, avoiding abbreviations, making sure everything recorded is based on factual evidence and always checking your spelling and grammar, especially before making the catalogue publically available online. Consistency in the format and terms of a museum catalogue is an aspect that should be monitored and quite possibly requires someone with the traits of pedanticism to keep it intact.  The use of thesauri to achieve consistency with the names of different materials, geographic and object names is something that I can see is really essential throughout the cataloguing process.

Moya Sherriff

Images:

All images courtesy of Canterbury Cultural Collections Recovery Centre.

Other posts by Moya:

Diary of the CCCRC intern – month 1

Diary of the CCCRC intern – month 2

Diary of the CCCRC intern – month 3

Diary of the CCCRC intern – month 4

Diary of the CCCRC intern – month 5

Diary of the CCCRC intern – month 6